Blog — Issue Six RSS



More of That

  This weekend was incredible. We had a full house of close to 30 people in the shop, wrapping and shipping out Issue Six. We had people from all over New England, New York, and even as far as Minnesota. There was, as always, an abundance of incredible food (thank you, Julia and Andrea) and life-changing conversation. Even though I have experienced it with each issue, I was again in awe that most everyone that comes to these things seems to be deeply moved. During the week leading up to the event, Mike and I had several interactions with folks in town explaining what exactly it was we were doing over the weekend. We explained that we spend weeks preparing...

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Last Call for Issue Six Pre-orders!

Today is the last day to get in your pre-order for Issue Six. After tomorrow, Issue Six will no longer have free domestic shipping and come wrapped in brown paper and wax-sealed trade card. If you don’t want to miss this pre-order window, You can subscribe today. or You can order Issue Six by itself.   We are so excited about how this issue has turned out. There is such a rich diversity of content spanning conversations about slöjd, William Morris, George Nakashima, Revolutionary War chairmaking, German tradition painted decoration, making your own woodworking tools, and so much more. Despite the breadth, though, this issue has the strongest cohesiveness yet. There must have been something in the air, because each author seems...

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Podcast #12 – “The Radical Efficiency of Green Woodworking”

In this episode of our podcast, Mike discusses his article “A Tale of Two Trees: The Radical Efficiency of Green Woodworking” in upcoming Issue Six. Mike presents a big picture view of procuring lumber by comparing industrial logging and milling with harvesting your own with hand tools. He makes the startling (and compelling) case that green woodworking is more efficient in the big picture than highly developed industrial processing. We discuss the value of curved branches, the genius of coppicing, and working the material before it dries. Items Mentioned in this Podcast: Issue Six Dawson Moore – Michigan Sloyd  

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Issue Six is Here!

Look at what we’ve got: Issue Six has arrived at our storage facility! This means we’re now getting close to shipment to customers – we’ve got one week, in fact, to get ready for the big packing party. Monday, April 1st, after the weekend-long packing, we will be driving a full truck to the Post Office. (Joel, our awesome Postmaster, here at our tiny Blue Hill Post Office arranges for a special truck to be ready to receive our massive deliveries. Joel’s the best.) Our printer has been dialing in the printing of each issue better and better and this one is the best yet. I won’t get into the technical details, but basically, the premium uncoated paper (70# Finch...

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Pre-order Issue Six Now!

  We are excited to announce Issue Six is now available for pre-order in our store! (There is free domestic shipping on all pre-orders and subscriptions.) If you don’t already have a subscription, you can sign up here. or If you want to pre-order only this issue, you can do so here.   This pre-order window will close after Tuesday, March 26th. After that date, the shipping charge will be applied and there will be no brown paper and wax-sealed wrapping.  

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Issue Six: At Work in the Cabinetmaking Shop - Brock Jobe

Plans are afoot to build a woodworker’s shop at Old Sturbridge Village.  A commitment to craft has long been central to the museum’s mission to recreate a New England community of the early 1800s. Today visitors can see a potter, printer, tinsmith, blacksmith, shoemaker, and cooper in action, and during the early years of the Village, which opened in 1946, cabinet- and chairmakers demonstrated there as well.  However, in the mid-1980s, financial pressures and retirements of key craftsmen brought an end to the interpretation of the furniture trades.  Now thirty years later, new research on the prominence of cabinetmaking in the Sturbridge area has revived interest in representing the craft to the public.    

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Issue Six: Double-iron Planes with Steve Voigt

Double-iron planes. Few tools in the woodworker’s repertoire have inspired as many debates among pundits, armchair craftsmen, and makers. Some argue that the best way of dealing with difficult and figured grain is to use a single iron, steep bed angle, and tight mouth. Others disagree, singing the praises of this “new” 18th-century plane technology.

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Issue Six: The Radical Efficiency of Green Woodworking

What we call “green woodworking” today carried no such particular distinction, historically – the work of vernacular woodcraft naturally began with the tree in the forest. Join author Michael Updegraff as he looks at the close connection that makers of the past had with the raw materials they worked, and the practical benefits that can be gained today by approaching wood not just as a dimensioned-and-dried material to be purchased at a lumberyard or home center, but as the living thing that it is.

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Issue Six: A Windsor Chair Called "Henry" - Nathaniel Brewster

We are announcing one Issue Six article each weekday until pre-orders open on February 1st. If you don’t already have a subscription and just wanted to order a copy of Issue Six by itself, you may do so on February 1st.  If you signed up for an auto-renewing yearly subscription, your card will be automatically charged exactly 365 days from your original purchase date. Any questions about your subscription status can be directed to info@mortiseandtenonmag.com. Sometimes a chair is more than a chair. Sometimes, it makes a statement about time and place that transcends the substance of humbly painted wood. Author Nathaniel Brewster takes a look at such a chair - an 18th-century New England Windsor that he affectionately dubs “Henry.” As he...

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Issue Six: Jögge Sundqvist - Slöjd and the Good Life

The joy of working wood with simple tools should display itself in what is made. This is certainly true in the case of Swedish slöjd practitioner Jögge Sundqvist. He began carving beautiful, whimsical, and practical wooden objects under the tutelage of his father Wille, and today teaches the craft all over the world.

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